Friday, June 27, 2008

What to Do with Evan's Garden



Well, I haven't felt much like writing lately, because of the continuing drought and hot weather. I've been discouraged about the future of my little gardens. When I planted Evan's Garden last year, I thought that I had a part sun area. Maybe 3 hours of sunshine. So, I planted things like Hosta, Hydrangea, Ferns, and some neat woodland natives. Once summer began it became obvious that this was not a part sun area. It's full sun. So, I've got Hydrangeas wilting in direct sunlight until about 2 o'clock in the afternoon. The blooms are enormous, because of the sunshine, but I'm having to baby them. So, I decided that I'll move them to a shadier spot later this year. I'm also starting to see that I'll need to move a lot of other shade lovers from Evan's garden to a new home. It's kind of sad. I spent a lot of time and effort to design and plant this little garden. Too bad I didn't do the observation I shoulda done. Oh well. Live and learn, right? The fun thing about finding out that this is a full sun bed, is that now I can find some fun full sun plants to put there. So, I'm not even in the planning stage. I'm in the thinking stage. And I'm thinking sunflowers, more named Evan dahlias and coneflowers, and drought tolerant stuff. What do you think would be fun in a child's memorial garden? I need ideas!

2 comments:

sherrie said...

Sunflowers are a great idea! Maybe some of those pom-pom mums he loved? And poppies! I saw a pic the other day of peony poppies and thought you'd LOVE them, they are soooo gorgeous.

Amy said...

Bottle brush trees are fun. It might be a bit too cold in winter, and it might be a bit too wet in non-drought years where you live. Here in my yard, where it rarely frosts and rarely rains, I have one that is doing well. New leaves are soft and fuzzy like puppy ears, fun for kids to touch. And the flowers are bright red and start up all coiled up inside their little pods, and then sproing out dramatically.
All very fun. If you want a tree. You can keep it small by pruning I think. Here are some links:

http://hort.ufl.edu/trees/CALVIMA.pdf

http://davesgarden.com/guides/pf/go/2331/